why i’d rather eat pancakes than vote in bukoto south

I have not been an actively involved person in any elections recently, all i wished for, was better leaders to come out of them especially since my disappointments in the EALA elections.

So when, the court declared the bukoto-south seat vacant, i finally had my chance, to switch on the political screen and sit back with my pack of pop-corn, and watch the events unfold one by one.

I tirelessly watched, till it eventually got boring to watch any more, even movie directors know when the introduction to the movie ends unlike our politicians, they ‘politicked’ all the way through.

Winning the people’s vote slowly shifted from the quality of manifesto to who was in the good eyes of their cultural leader, and the mindset of voters slowly found it’s hub in the politicians trickery, then voting lost all form of ‘little’ meaning that it would have added to the bukoto south populace.

First, voting should never be premised on cultural leaders’ influence, it may be a factor for getting into power but certainly, it does not serve the purpose of being in power.

In a country of poor service delivery, soda drips and transfusions, quality of leaders needs to be checked for a more pro-efficient sort of government to exist. This type of government cannot be achieved by simply voting who is in the good eyes of the other without ever considering their manifestos.

When a populace scales the heights of poverty, unemployment, disaster crisis, corruption, conflicting society and illiteracy, you do not need funny schemers envisaging protecting interests rather than propose solutions in high-level places like the parliament.

Am certainly not rebuking the bukoto south populace but this vote should be a benchmark learning experience for the constituency and the rest of the country. Many a time, we are taken up by the politics surrounding election that we end up passing sympathy votes or boycott votes to prove our point but in the essence, it has paid us back with outstandingly non-functional leadership whose major aim is bent on achieving personal greed and neither can we trace their manifestos to pin them down.

Uganda has to learn a voting culture whose ideals are not taught but in–built, the common good is arrived at by the common share of problems, if we torched our personal selves, we’d not fail to find 10 similarities in failures with  our neighbors and this is what serves the common good and guides policy planning and implementation.

 

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